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Ranunculus californica - California Buttercup

Ranunculus californica - California Buttercup

This is the only buttercup in Northern California with more than 7 petals and yellow.


Ranunculus hispidus

Ranunculus hispidus

Once again I don't have much to say about this species. Unfortunately, botany is not my primary field, or I might know a bit more.


Rhexia nuttallii - Nuttall's Meadowbeauty

Rhexia nuttallii - Nuttall's Meadowbeauty

This is in the family Melastomataceae, and looks a bit odd for a Rhexia


Rhododendron macrophyllum - Rhododendron

Rhododendron macrophyllum - Rhododendron

These beautiful trees require fairly acidic soil, which makes them hard to cultivate. The Northern California coastal habitat suits them perfectly though. This was taken in a pygmy forest


Rhynchospora colorata (Narrow-Leaf White-topped Sedge)

Rhynchospora colorata (Narrow-Leaf White-topped Sedge)

I thought this was a lily, but apparently it is in fact a sedge. This is one of my best flower photos, and I took it quite a while ago.


Ribes malvaceum (Chapparal Currant)

Ribes malvaceum (Chapparal Currant)

Also known as gooseberries, these plants are spiny and bushy, and that about sums them up in my knowledge base.


Rubus sp - Blackberry

Rubus sp - Blackberry

This is one of several species of Rubus that I don't know how to separate. It's a member of the rose family, Rosaceae


Rudbeckia triloba (Thin-leaved Coneflower)

Rudbeckia triloba (Thin-leaved Coneflower)

I believe this is also known as Brown-eyed Susan. I'd also like to note that the leaves do not seem particularly thin...


Ruellia humilis - Hairy Wild Petunia

Ruellia humilis - Hairy Wild Petunia

First species of Petunia I've shot. It's not as colorful as those you buy in stores.


Sabatia angularis

Sabatia angularis

This is another species of Gentian, its has considerably more flowers than the other two species I've posted.


Sabatia brevifolia - White Sabatia

Sabatia brevifolia - White Sabatia

This pretty flower is a member of the Gentian family. First time I've managed to get a decent shot, though there is a shadow on it.


Sabatia grandiflora - Large-flower Sabatia

Sabatia grandiflora - Large-flower Sabatia

This is a southern member of the Gentian family and is pretty common in Florida.


Sagittaria latifolia (Duck Potato)

Sagittaria latifolia (Duck Potato)

As far as I know, this has nothing to do with potatoes. It is however, relatively common in southern Florida, and is usually growing in or very near water.


Salvia azurea - Blue Salvia

Salvia azurea - Blue Salvia

Another shot of this plant. There was quite a bit of it in bloom, which surprised me since it's already mid-september


Sambucus mexicana - Blue Elderberry

Sambucus mexicana - Blue Elderberry

The flower is white, the berries blue... and apparently you can make jam from them. It smells nice in any case


Sarcodes sanguinea (Snowplant)

Sarcodes sanguinea (Snowplant)

These are really cool saprophytic plants (they can't produce chlorophyll) that are found, among other places, in the Sierra Nevadas. This specimen is very, very old (in the sense that the bloom is very old, not the plant). Usually these are much more compact and the red globular balls aren't very prominent.


Sarcodes sanguinea - Snowplant

Sarcodes sanguinea - Snowplant

Here's a younger plant, considerably more colorful


Scoliopus bigelovii (Fetid Adder's Tongue)

Scoliopus bigelovii (Fetid Adder's Tongue)

Finally a plant with a name that is fitting! These lilies stink to high heaven and are pollinated almost exclusively by flies (though I don't know if a specific group of flies is involved, though it probably is). Amazingly, these plants come out usually in January and early February. This specimen was photographed at the end of November! Can anyone say "Global Warming"


Scoliopus bigelovii - Fetid Adder's Tongue

Scoliopus bigelovii - Fetid Adder's Tongue

A member of the Lily family. So named for the odor of rotting meat that it produces to attract flies, which pollinate them. Can be found growing in Redwood forests in February.


Scutellaria resinosa

Scutellaria resinosa

Another flower that was finally ID'd for me. I knew it was in the snapdragon family, but couldn't figure out any more than that. This was growing on a rocky bluff overlooking a lake in western Kansas


Senecio bicolor (Coastal Ragwort)

Senecio bicolor (Coastal Ragwort)

This is a fairly common plant along the coast of California, and is easily distinguished by the strongly lobed leaves.


Senecio elegans (Purple Ragwort)

Senecio elegans (Purple Ragwort)

Like so many of the plants found growing along the coast of California, this is not native to the US. It makes up for this by bringing a wonderful purple color to the scene, one that is definitely lacking unless there is Pink Sand-Verbena around.


Sidalcea calycosa rhizomata

Sidalcea calycosa rhizomata

I found a few of these plants in wet areas at Point Reyes, this is one of two subspecies in the Bay Area


Sidalcea oregona - Checker Mallow

Sidalcea oregona - Checker Mallow

This was a small plant that was pretty innocuous in the meadow areas we were exploring


Sidalcia malvaeflora - California Checker-Mallow

Sidalcia malvaeflora - California Checker-Mallow

Haven't shot too many members of the Mallow family, so it's nice to diversify a bit.


Silene acaulis (Moss Campion)

Silene acaulis (Moss Campion)

Found this particular specimen in a high alpine meadow on Parker's Ridge in Banff National Park. I don't know whether it is unique to this habitat or whether I just happened to find it there. As with a lot of alpine plants, it's very low to the ground, which makes me think it might only live at high elevations.


Silene californica (Indian Pink)

Silene californica (Indian Pink)

Not much in terms of foliage on this particular plant, the flowers make up for it though.


Silphium integrifolium - Rosin Weed

Silphium integrifolium - Rosin Weed

Another member of the Asteraceae family.


Silphium laciniatum - Compass Plant

Silphium laciniatum - Compass Plant

This is called compass plant because its leaves at the base are always oriented north-to-south.


Sisyrinchium sp - Blue-eyed Grass

Sisyrinchium sp - Blue-eyed Grass

Can't figure out the species on this one. The flower looks like a Lily, but is actually in the Iris family


Sisyrinchum bellum (California Blue-eyed Grass)

Sisyrinchum bellum (California Blue-eyed Grass)

Despite its similarity to lilies, this is a member of the Iris family, which is also a monocot, so its not too distantly related to lilies.


Sisyrinchum campestre - Blue-eyed Grass

Sisyrinchum campestre - Blue-eyed Grass

Looks like a lily, but it's actually and Iris


Solanum xanti (Purple Nightshade)

Solanum xanti (Purple Nightshade)

It might have berries, but please refrain from eating them. This is a member of the deadly poisonous nightshade family Solanaceae


Solidago odora var. chapmanii - Chapmans Goldenrod

Solidago odora var. chapmanii - Chapmans Goldenrod

ID'd this by process of elimination, luckily in JDSP there aren't many Solidago to choose from


Sphaeralcea rusbyi - Rusby's Globemallow

Sphaeralcea rusbyi - Rusby's Globemallow

Used the leaf shape to ID this fairly large, bush-like plant with tiny flowers.


Spiranthes porrifolia (Western Lady's Tresses)

Spiranthes porrifolia (Western Lady's Tresses)

I was surprised to learn that this is not in fact Spiranthes romanzofilla (Hooded Lady's Tresses), but rather the much rarer (at least in California) Western Lady's Tresses. This individual was hiding out in the midst of a very wet meadow.


Spiranthes romanzoffiana

Spiranthes romanzoffiana

Another Lady's Tresses orchid. Quite a few of them growing near the geysers in Yellowstone


Spiranthes vernalis - Spring Lady's Tresses

Spiranthes vernalis - Spring Lady's Tresses

Here's another photo of Sprianthes vernalis. I actually used a key to identify this, so I'm very confident of the ID. Found it growing in a drainage ditch.


Spiranthes vernalis - Spring Lady's Tresses

Spiranthes vernalis - Spring Lady's Tresses

This is another orchid in the Spiranthes genus, and a very pretty one at that.


Stachys bullata

Stachys bullata

Here's a shot of a field of Hedge Nettle


Stachys bullata - Hedge Nettle

Stachys bullata - Hedge Nettle

This showy flower is a Hedge Nettle, and it was growing in large numbers in a seepage area at Abbott's Lagoon


Streptanthus tortuosus - Shieldleaf

Streptanthus tortuosus - Shieldleaf

Here's another photo showing the whole plant better


Streptanthus totuosus (Shieldleaf)

Streptanthus totuosus (Shieldleaf)

The leaves of this odd little plant completely encircle the stem, shielding it, hence the name. It's also a really tiny flower.


Stylomecon heterophylla - Wind Poppy

Stylomecon heterophylla - Wind Poppy

Here's a showy member of the Poppy family, which seams fairly well represented in California


Suriana maritima - Bay Cedar

Suriana maritima - Bay Cedar

Host plant for a cool species of Acmaeodera, I think A. xanthosticta


Swertia radiata

Swertia radiata

This a very bizarre member of the Gentian family. It grows up to 6 feet tall at high elevations. These were ear 9000'


Tillandsia balbisiana - Northern Needleplant

Tillandsia balbisiana - Northern Needleplant

This is a threatened species that was fairly common in Jonathan Dickinson. The flower is much more slender than it is in some of the similar looking species.


Tillandsia fasciculata (Quill-Leaf)

Tillandsia fasciculata (Quill-Leaf)

Bromeliads are a tropical family with surprisingly few North American examples, though one of them is the extremely prevalent Spanish Moss. Tillandsia is one of the classic genera in the family, with a large number of species based on a similar design to this one.


Tillandsia fasciculata - Quill Leaf

Tillandsia fasciculata - Quill Leaf

Here's a beauty of a bromeliad, it brings a touch of the tropics to Southern Florida


Tillandsia fasciculata - Quill Leaf

Tillandsia fasciculata - Quill Leaf

Here's a close up of the flower head


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